Official cause of Alexis Lancaster’s death still 6-7 weeks away

Alexis

The official cause of death of 19-year-old, former Rockwall High School cheerleader Alexis Lancaster will not be available for release for another six to seven more weeks.

According to the Dallas Coroner’s Office, the standard length of time it takes to conduct toxicology tests and report their findings is eight weeks.

The popular 2008 RHS graduate was found dead in her Dallas apartment Saturday morning, Oct. 24.

She is survived by her mother, Leah Pearl Gentzler, and husband, Stan, of Rockwall, who own Gentzler Electrical Services in Dallas; and her father, Stephen Scott Lancaster, and wife Kristi, of Caddo Mills.

According to several sources who asked that their names not be used, she had been on a date Oct. 23 with a young man named Ben.

The sources said she took a recreational drug that night known as “bars,” which is a slang term for alprazolam – a fast-acting sedative which helps users to relax. 

According to the website Drugs.com, a well-known brand name for alprazolam is Xanax, which is generally prescribed to treat anxiety disorders. When mixed with alcohol, it can increase the effects of alcohol and can be deadly.

From the website:

“Quad bars are a common slang for Xanax 2mg tablets, which are bar shaped and can be broken into 4 .5mg doses. It is in a class of drugs called benzodiazapines, which also include Valium (diazapam),  Lithobid (lithium) and Ativan (lorazopam). All benzodiazapines are CNS sedatives, meaning they act directly on the brain to relax muscles, respiration rate, heart rate and provide an overall feeling of relaxation.”

“Benzodiazapines are prescribed to combat anxiety, insomnia, muscle tension, and involuntary movements like jaw clenching and shaking-leg syndrome. Benzodiazapines are also known to cause antegrade amnesia (short-term memory loss) at moderate to high doses. For this reason they are often used as an adjunct to pre-surgery anesthesia to avoid remembering the procedure.” 

“Benzodiazapines are popular among some recreational drug users who find the sedating and relaxing effects enjoyable, and often mix them with other CNS depressants like alcohol. Xanax is considered to be one of the most desireable benzos for recreational use because of it’s fast onset and shorter period of action than other benzos.”

“Xanax, like all benzos, is a schedule IV controlled substance in the US, making possession without a perscription illegal, and transfer or sale illegal without a license.”

The sources said that a 911 call was placed by someone, which will become available from Dallas police soon due to the open records law.

They added that her death was openly discussed during Drug Awareness Week last week at Rockwall High school between many students and teachers.

No other information has been confirmed at this point.

We did place a call to step-father Stan Genztler at his office today but have not yet received a reply.

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